GameBanana Icon GB Article

Demystifying Source Engine Visleaves

Attention Gamer! We are one of the oldest mod sites on the Interwebs. Sign up and maximize your browsing experience.

  • Subscribe: Get notified of new submissions like this.
  • Say Thanks: Show your appreciation by sending will2k points.
  • Post: Give will2k your thoughts on this Article.
  • Watch: Get notified when this Article is updated.
Mascot

Resistance is futile...

Join GameBanana

Already a Bananite? Login

An article in which I explain Source visleaves in layman's terms to allow beginners and veterans alike to understand the cornerstone of source optimization

Demystifying Source Engine Visleaves

Intro

Another fitting title for this article would have been “a beginners’ guide to source engine visleaves”; this is because I will be simplifying the definition of visleaves using layman’s terms and plain English in a way that even beginners can understand and grasp.

I won’t be using technical jargon or advanced lingo; just simple terms even absolute beginners can follow. It is very important to grasp the concept of visleaves, otherwise all optimization efforts will be useless and aimless. Once visleaves are understood, optimization becomes very easy; you can trust me on this one and you will see it unfold throughout this article.


Definition in plain English

Before defining visleaves and giving tangible examples, let me give you a brief historical background about them.

Visleaves were first discovered by Adam and Eve as they used “leaves” to cover the “visibility” of their private parts. The guys at Id Software learned about this discovery and wanted to acquire the copyrights of these visleaves. Adam refused, so Id threatened to summon a powerful “Quake” that will bring “Doom” upon humanity. Adam had no choice but to relinquish visleaves to Id.

Now with this “accurate and very true” historical background out of the way, let us examine the modern definition of visleaves, in the frame of the Source engine (if you want an in-depth look at BSP and visleaves concept, please consult my paper Man Vs Engine, paragraph II).

In the simplest definition possible, a visleaf is just a polyhedron (polygon in 3D space), most likely a cube or rectangular cuboid, although other shapes are viable options too. Think of a visleaf as a room with 4 walls, a floor and a ceiling, only these are transparent and non-solid.

Any map in Source is basically a group of these “rooms” connected together where the player can freely travel from one to another (as long as they are on ground level); the player can only be in one “room” at any time.

The size and borders of these “rooms” are generally decided by the surrounding geometry (the world brushes) and by hints and areaportals. The creation and division of these “rooms” is done by vbsp during the map’s compiling.

Let us check some examples about these “rooms” or better revert to calling them visleaves, shall we. I will use my map cs_calm for the examples.



Can you see the blue lines going on the XYZ axes to form a rectangular cuboid? Good. This is the visleaf, plain and simple. I, the player, am standing right inside the visleaf.

Let me switch to third person view so you could have a better angle to check the visleaf.



Much better now?

You can clearly see that the player is within the borders of the visleaf. As I said earlier, the player can only be in 1 visleaf at any time.

From the top view, we can represent the flat visleaf as a rectangle. We will call this visleaf “A” for the remainder of this article.



Once these visleaves are created, vvis runs an algorithm to calculate visibility between these visleaves and to determine what we colloquially refer to as a visleaf “seeing” another visleaf.

In the simplest explanation of how “seeing” is determined, just imagine that vvis is Robin Hood with his bow and arrows; vvis, sorry Robin, will stand in the visleaf and fire his arrow towards another visleaf in a perfect straight line. If the arrow reaches the other visleaf unobstructed, then a direct line of sight (LOS) between these 2 visleaves is established, and we can say that the first visleaf can “see” the second visleaf. If the arrow has to cross a world brush/geometry, a skybox brush or travel in parabolic/hyperbolic trajectory to reach the second visleaf, then there is no LOS and these 2 visleaves cannot “see” each other.



In the screenshot above, visleaf B is adjacent to our visleaf A, therefore, a direct LOS can be established between them (white arrow). A and B can see each other.

The second visleaf does not need to be adjacent to be seen. A visleaf further away can still be directly seen by A.



In the screenshot above, the white arrow shoots straight from A to C which means A can see C (no pun intended)



In the screenshot above, a straight line cannot be established between visleaves A and X, therefore A cannot see X (the arrow can start anywhere inside the first visleaf and end anywhere inside the second visleaf).

Remember that one visleaf is not restricted to see only one other visleaf, it can see several visleaves that are surrounding it (just imagine you are in the bedroom with the door open and you can see the living room, the dining room, the second bedroom and possibly part of the kitchen). The number of other visleaves that can be seen from one visleaf is called the potentially visible set (PVS).

The PVS is dynamic by nature; it changes as soon as you move your position to another visleaf. If visleaf A can see visleaves B, C, and D, then the PVS when standing in A is (BCD). If you move to visleaf B and B can see A, C, D, E, and F, then the PVS when standing in B is (ACDEF).

An image would be better illustrating the PVS.



In the screenshot above, we still have our initial visleaf A and the 2 visleaves B and C which we established that they can be seen from A. In addition, I have painted in orange all the visleaves/areas that are seen from A (a direct LOS can be established).

This orange area in addition to B and C is basically the PVS, the collection of all visleaves that can be seen from visleaf A. Please note that these visleaves that I highlighted are for a well optimized map, otherwise the PVS would have been bigger.

Link between optimization and visleaves

Now that we know what a visleaf is, how it is created, and how visibility and interaction with other visleaves is done, the big question looms in the horizon.

What does all this have to do with optimization? After all, I promised you earlier that once you understand visleaves, optimization becomes the easy part. I’m a man of my word and I will keep my promise.

As I said in the intro, I won’t be using technical definitions or go into in-depth analysis but I still need to briefly and very clearly explain the BSP concept so we can relate visleaves with optimization.

The BSP, or Binary Space Partition, is the method that the Source engine uses to compute visibility. We have already seen that during the compile phase, vbsp takes care of creating the visleaves in the map then vvis shoots its arrows and calculates the visibility between visleaves. All this info (visleaves’ locations, PVS, visibility matrix) are stored in the BSP tree (think of it as a big library shelf where each book is neatly labeled and indexed for easier retrieval at a later stage).

The BSP uses “visibility from a region” approach since the regions or visleaves are already created and the visibility matrix is calculated. What does that mean in plain English?

I, the player, am standing in visleaf A as we have seen earlier. The engine immediately knows that I can be in only one visleaf at a time and it is currently visleaf A. The engine goes quickly to the neatly indexed book shelf (the BSP tree) and checks visleaf A. The information retrieval is instantaneous and the engine swiftly recognizes what other visleaves can be directly seen from A (The PVS).

With all this info clearly available, the engine will proceed to render ALL the visleaves in the PVS of A; when the visleaves are rendered, ALL their content is rendered too. Let’s get back to the previous screenshot to better display this info.



The engine does not care where I am exactly standing in visleaf A; it does not matter if I am standing to the left or right, in the center, or on the edges. As long as I’m inside visleaf A, the engine renders all the PVS of A, the orange area in addition to B and C (that is why it is called visibility from a region method).

Other games might use the “visibility from a point” approach where the engine calculates and renders the world around you in real time relative to the exact position you are standing at. The Source engine doesn’t care about your exact location rather about the visleaf you are standing in, to determine what is rendered and what is not.

You can now clearly notice the quintessential role and importance of the visleaf in your optimization endeavor.

The immediate conclusion you can draw from all this explanation is that the smaller the PVS, the better fps you will have. A smaller PVS means fewer visleaves to draw and fewer visleaves’ content to render (brushes, textures, props, entities…).

There you go; I kept my promise :)

All you need to focus and concentrate on while optimizing a map in Source is to make sure any given visleaf in the map can see the minimum amount of visleaves around it.

In my paper Man Vs Engine, I summarized optimization in one sentence and I feel I should repeat it here to emphasize what I just said.

Your ultimate goal is to make a specific visleaf “see” the least amount of adjacent leaves thus preventing the engine from rendering the content of these “unseen” leaves which will reduce engine overhead and increase frame rate.

Now that you know the essence of optimization, the tools and techniques become easier. You will mostly use the layout itself, skybox brushes, func_detail, and hint brushes to delimit visleaves, cut large visleaves into smaller ones and make sure the visleaf in hand sees the utmost minimal amount of surrounding visleaves.

For visleaves’ content, and in addition to hints, you will likely use areaportals, occluders, props fade distance, and nodraw to keep visible render-able content at a minimum and prevent the engine from over-rendering which will inevitably lower your fps.

Let’s re-examine the PVS screenshot but this time assuming the map to be un-optimized properly.





You can note that, in addition to our original PVS (orange area + B + C), the PVS of the un-optimized map is bigger with the additional purple area added. Without proper optimization and control, the visleaves tend to be large, covering wide areas, and extending around corners and upwards. This only means that visleaf A will see a much larger number of surrounding visleaves; the PVS will be bigger. When you stand in visleaf A now, the engine will render practically twice the number of visleaves compared to the optimized map version (orange area). When your PVS doubles, your fps will decrease, and depending on the visleaves’ content and amount of brushes/models/entities, it could be as severe as plunging to half its original value.

Conclusion

As I promised you in the beginning and as we have seen throughout this article, optimization in itself is quite easy once you grasp the concept of visleaf.

Visleaves are the cornerstone of the Source engine since the whole visibility calculation and approach relies on them and their spatial order.

Once you realize how Source engine uses visleaves to compute visibility, optimization becomes intuitive; fewer visleaves visible at a time, higher fps and everyone is happy.

Will2k

November 16, 2015

Posts

  • 2y
    will2k avatar
    will2k avatar Offline
    Super Moderator Joined 7y
    29,619 points Ranked 146th
    30 medals 2 legendary 7 rare
    • 1st Place - Tutorials Contest Medal icon
    • 500 posts awarded Exemplary Feedback Medal icon
    • 50 posts awarded Exemplary Feedback Medal icon
    • 100 posts awarded Exemplary Feedback Medal icon
    • 200 posts awarded Exemplary Feedback Medal icon
    • Achieved Super Moderator clearance Medal icon
    will2k avatar
    will2k
    Map Critic
  • 2y
    will2k avatar
    will2k avatar Offline
    Super Moderator Joined 7y
    29,619 points Ranked 146th
    30 medals 2 legendary 7 rare
    • 1st Place - Tutorials Contest Medal icon
    • 500 posts awarded Exemplary Feedback Medal icon
    • 50 posts awarded Exemplary Feedback Medal icon
    • 100 posts awarded Exemplary Feedback Medal icon
    • 200 posts awarded Exemplary Feedback Medal icon
    • Achieved Super Moderator clearance Medal icon
    will2k avatar
    will2k
    Map Critic
    Posted by Lord Canistra

    Indeed, I hold some interest in game engine design (and my primary occupation is in the field of programming). I also just cannot sleep peacefully if I'm using any piece of software or hardware that I do not have a sufficient comprehension of. Not being aware of inner workings and relying on some sort of behind-the-scenes magic just doesn't cut it - it only gets me more paranoid about all the possible and impossible ways for things to go wrong in that device or application.

    That's what led me to seek documentation on original Quake, and, just like you mentioned, the most useful and complete material I've found was in form of theses describing visibility optimization techniques used in Quake and Unreal, including breakdown of level space using BSP trees and using these to calculate PVS.

    I'm pretty sure that this part would be of great interest to at least some level designers, in a form of mildly run-down version of those old articles with little to no code and updated schematics.  Maybe I'll even write one some day, after I'm done with CS:GO gamemode I'm working on right now.
    We do have this in common then, not programming, but the urge to know a system from the inside out to have some peace of mind :)

    It seems some mappers/designers are showing interest to know more about this subject as I'm getting requests from Reddit and other places, so I guess I'll write a follow up to this article delving a little more into details about PVS creation and visibility calculation. I won't tackle the programming side obviously since I'm no programmer, and I'll leave this aspect for your article should you decide to write it :)

    Always a pleasure to have technical conversations with you, cheers.

    cosa dici! avatar
    Mantra
    cosa dici!
  • 2y
    Lord Canistra avatar
    Member Joined 9y
    10,855 points Ranked 388th
    20 medals 1 legendary 3 rare
    • 1st Place - 2016 Winter Mapping Contest Medal icon
    • 6 years a member Medal icon
    • 2nd Place - Beneath the Dust Mapping Contest Medal icon
    • Returned 1000 times Medal icon
    • Reached 1,000 Points Medal icon
    • Reached 2,500 Points Medal icon
    Posted by will2k
    I doubt level designers would be interested enough to know all these in details. I guess this would be interesting for engine programmers or computer science majors (which I assume you are one?), and these folks would be better suited to check some advanced papers on BSP and PVS.

    For mappers, knowing the basics of visleaves and PVS and how it relates to optimization efforts is more than enough to produce solid maps in my opinion. If someone is curious enough to know more about these subjects, there are some excellent papers and theses from the Quake era. Just be prepared to go through pages upon pages of mind-melting code and diagrams; I did that couple of years ago out of curiosity and I'm not even a programmer or computer science major haha :)

    Indeed, I hold some interest in game engine design (and my primary occupation is in the field of programming). I also just cannot sleep peacefully if I'm using any piece of software or hardware that I do not have a sufficient comprehension of. Not being aware of inner workings and relying on some sort of behind-the-scenes magic just doesn't cut it - it only gets me more paranoid about all the possible and impossible ways for things to go wrong in that device or application.

    That's what led me to seek documentation on original Quake, and, just like you mentioned, the most useful and complete material I've found was in form of theses describing visibility optimization techniques used in Quake and Unreal, including breakdown of level space using BSP trees and using these to calculate PVS.

    I'm pretty sure that this part would be of great interest to at least some level designers, in a form of mildly run-down version of those old articles with little to no code and updated schematics.  Maybe I'll even write one some day, after I'm done with CS:GO gamemode I'm working on right now.
  • 2y
    will2k avatar
    will2k avatar Offline
    Super Moderator Joined 7y
    29,619 points Ranked 146th
    30 medals 2 legendary 7 rare
    • 1st Place - Tutorials Contest Medal icon
    • 500 posts awarded Exemplary Feedback Medal icon
    • 50 posts awarded Exemplary Feedback Medal icon
    • 100 posts awarded Exemplary Feedback Medal icon
    • 200 posts awarded Exemplary Feedback Medal icon
    • Achieved Super Moderator clearance Medal icon
    will2k avatar
    will2k
    Map Critic
    Posted by Lord Canistra

    It's a nice entry-level read, made even better by the fact that it's immediately available - as opposed to PDF downloads.

    But I'm fairly sure that explaining the anti-penumbra method actually used to calculate visibility wouldn't be all that hard. You could present it visually as a light-filled room (the initial visleaf) trying to flood second order neighbouring rooms with light through visportals.

    This, however, does require an introduction of visportal concept. I guess this option is out if you're to keep the guide really simple.


    Hey, thanks for dropping by :)

    You changed your username and this confused me for a couple of seconds.

    Robin Hood beats anti-penumbra any day XD

    Explaining the actual PVS creation process in this "beginners" article would be way out of scope; the notions of portal generation, anti-penumbra clipping, source leaf, destination leaf, source portal, destination portal and view frustum culling would have to be explained and expanded.

    I doubt level designers would be interested enough to know all these in details. I guess this would be interesting for engine programmers or computer science majors (which I assume you are one?), and these folks would be better suited to check some advanced papers on BSP and PVS.

    For mappers, knowing the basics of visleaves and PVS and how it relates to optimization efforts is more than enough to produce solid maps in my opinion. If someone is curious enough to know more about these subjects, there are some excellent papers and theses from the Quake era. Just be prepared to go through pages upon pages of mind-melting code and diagrams; I did that couple of years ago out of curiosity and I'm not even a programmer or computer science major haha :)

    Thanks again for your always insightful comments.

    @ Animal1ty
    Thanks for the "thanks" :)
    cosa dici! avatar
    Mantra
    cosa dici!
  • 2y
    Lord Canistra avatar
    Member Joined 9y
    10,855 points Ranked 388th
    20 medals 1 legendary 3 rare
    • 1st Place - 2016 Winter Mapping Contest Medal icon
    • 6 years a member Medal icon
    • 2nd Place - Beneath the Dust Mapping Contest Medal icon
    • Returned 1000 times Medal icon
    • Reached 1,000 Points Medal icon
    • Reached 2,500 Points Medal icon
    It's a nice entry-level read, made even better by the fact that it's immediately available - as opposed to PDF downloads.

    But I'm fairly sure that explaining the anti-penumbra method actually used to calculate visibility wouldn't be all that hard. You could present it visually as a light-filled room (the initial visleaf) trying to flood second order neighbouring rooms with light through visportals.

    This, however, does require an introduction of visportal concept. I guess this option is out if you're to keep the guide really simple.

  • 2y
    will2k avatar
    will2k avatar Offline
    Super Moderator Joined 7y
    29,619 points Ranked 146th
    30 medals 2 legendary 7 rare
    • 1st Place - Tutorials Contest Medal icon
    • 500 posts awarded Exemplary Feedback Medal icon
    • 50 posts awarded Exemplary Feedback Medal icon
    • 100 posts awarded Exemplary Feedback Medal icon
    • 200 posts awarded Exemplary Feedback Medal icon
    • Achieved Super Moderator clearance Medal icon
    will2k avatar
    will2k
    Map Critic
    Posted by AlcyToronto

    Good one, Will, as always! Thank you very much.


    Ciao Alcy :), grazie tante. Your supportive comments are much appreciated
    cosa dici! avatar
    Mantra
    cosa dici!
  • 2y
    will2k avatar
    will2k avatar Offline
    Super Moderator Joined 7y
    29,619 points Ranked 146th
    30 medals 2 legendary 7 rare
    • 1st Place - Tutorials Contest Medal icon
    • 500 posts awarded Exemplary Feedback Medal icon
    • 50 posts awarded Exemplary Feedback Medal icon
    • 100 posts awarded Exemplary Feedback Medal icon
    • 200 posts awarded Exemplary Feedback Medal icon
    • Achieved Super Moderator clearance Medal icon
    will2k avatar
    will2k
    Map Critic
    Posted by Jonny-higgins

    Awesome article Will, great to see the technical theory behind level design explained in clear simple terms.


    Cheers mate :) and thanks for all the support
    cosa dici! avatar
    Mantra
    cosa dici!
  • 2y
    AlcyToronto avatar
    Member Joined 4y
    6,443 points Ranked 687th
    15 medals 2 rare
    • Returned 1000 times Medal icon
    • Submitted 20 Maps Medal icon
    • Reached 1,000 Points Medal icon
    • Reached 2,500 Points Medal icon
    • 1 post awarded Exemplary Feedback Medal icon
    • 5 posts awarded Exemplary Feedback Medal icon
    Good one, Will, as always! Thank you very much.

    fair-player and mapper
  • 2y
    Jonny-higgins avatar
    Jonny-higgins avatar DRUNK...
    Admin Joined 10y
    199,433 points Ranked 15th
    42 medals 4 legendary 10 rare
    • Achieved Admin clearance Medal icon
    • Submitted 200 Threads Medal icon
    • Reached 100 subscribers Medal icon
    • 10 years a member Medal icon
    • Reached 75,000 Points Medal icon
    • 6 years a member Medal icon
    Awesome article Will, great to see the technical theory behind level design explained in clear simple terms.

Share

Shareable Image:
Share banner
HTML embed code:
BB embed code:
Markdown embed code:

More embeddable images

Bookmark and Share

Submitter

will2k avatar
will2k avatar Offline
Super Moderator Joined 7y
29,619 points Ranked 146th
30 medals 2 legendary 7 rare
  • 1st Place - Tutorials Contest Medal icon
  • 500 posts awarded Exemplary Feedback Medal icon
  • 50 posts awarded Exemplary Feedback Medal icon
  • 100 posts awarded Exemplary Feedback Medal icon
  • 200 posts awarded Exemplary Feedback Medal icon
  • Achieved Super Moderator clearance Medal icon

will2k avatar
will2k
Send a Private Message to the submitter

Category

Stats

Posts
9
Views
4,745
Date Added
2y
Date Modified
12mo

Featurings

  • Today's Pick Nov 17 2015
  • Best of Yesterday Nov 18 2015
  • Best of the Banana Nov 19 2015
bcp.crwdcntrl.net tracking pixel